Plaquenil and ocular toxicity

Discussion in 'Canada Drugs Online' started by J-Bit, 12-Mar-2020.

  1. Crow Guest

    Plaquenil and ocular toxicity


    Her rheumatologist instructed her to undergo a baseline ocular examination prior to initiating Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine, Sanofi-Aventis) therapy. Toxic maculopathy associated with chloroquine use was first documented in the literature five decades ago.1 In the United States, Plaquenil––an analog to chloroquine––is used to treat a variety of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and several distinct inflammatory disorders. Although the incidence of macular toxicity is infrequent with Plaquenil use (at a dosage of 200mg or 400mg q.d.), its visual impact can be devastating.

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    The toxicity resulting from the intake of Plaquenil is due to its affinity for melanin-containing structures in the body. With prolonged usage, metabolites in the drug accumulate in the retina. The drug remains in these parts even if the patients stopped taking the drugs. Many systemic medications may cause retinal toxicity. One such commonly used medication for dermatologic and rheumatologic inflammatory conditions is hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil, a chloroquine derivative. It is used to treat many diseases including malaria, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Plaquenil, widely used to treat lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory and dermatologic conditions, is very effective, and “the risk of toxicity in the first five years for someone without special risk factors is very low,” Dr. Marmor said.

    Initially, central visual acuity may be unaffected, but the patient may notice related paracentral scotomas that often interfere with reading. The associated classic retinal toxicity is described as a bull’s eye maculopathy (ring of depigmented retinal pigment epithelium that spares the foveal area).

    Plaquenil and ocular toxicity

    Protecting your eyesight when taking Plaquenil Lupus., Hydroxychloroquine-Induced Retinal Toxicity - American.

  2. Plaquenil drug category
  3. Sep 15, 2014 Hydroxychloroquine sulfate HCQ, Plaquenil is an analogue of chloroquine CQ, an antimalarial agent, used for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders. Its use has been associated with severe retinal toxicity, requiring a discontinuation of therapy.

    • Retinal toxicity associated with chronic exposure to..
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    • Multimodal Imaging in Plaquenil Toxicity.

    Plaquenil is also used to treat symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and discoid or systemic lupus erythematosus. Plaquenil is available in generic form. What Are Side Effects of Plaquenil? Common side effects of Plaquenil include. nausea, vomiting, stomach pain or cramps, loss of appetite, weight loss, diarrhea, dizziness, spinning sensation, headache, Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil was originally used to treat malaria and is now used mostly to treat rheumatological and dermatological diseases. Its most frequent use now is for Rheumatoid Arthritis RA and Lupus and is often very effective in mitigating the joint and arthritic symptoms these diseases can cause. The risk of a toxicity sharply increases after 5 years, with majority of cases of retinotoxicity occurring in patients that have had a cumulative dose exceeding 1000g of hydroxychloriquine Plaquenil. This level is reached in about 7 years with the most common daily dose of Plaquenil, 400 mg/day 200 bid.

     
  4. FCoffee New Member

    This article focuses upon hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. Chloroquine was originally used as an anti-malarial therapeutic. Hydroxychloroquine-Induced Retinal Toxicity - American Academy of. Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy A review of imaging Will you have Weight loss with Plaquenil - eHealthMe
     
  5. tikver Moderator

    A recent publication in PNAS (Clippinger et al.) from the Greenberg lab was highlighted in Circulation. January 17th, 2020 – Weikai Li, Ph D, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, along with Laura Schuettpelz, MD, Ph D, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, received an Interdisciplinary Research Initiatives grant award from the Children’s Discovery Institute for their work entitled September 16th, 2019 – Jim Janetka, Ph D, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and Co-Founder of Prote Xase Therapeutics, Inc., along with Lidija Klampfer, Ph D, Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Prote Xase Therapeutics, Inc., received a one-year SBIR grant award from the National Cancer Institute for their research entitled August 1st, 2019 – Together with Kory Lavine and Kathleen Simpson, the Greenberg lab received a Large Scale Interdisciplinary Research Initiative Grant from the Children’s Discovery Institute. Synthesis and Physico -Chemical Properties in Aqueous Medium. Preferentially Higher Compaction THE JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY © 2000 by The American.
     
  6. svfolder New Member

    Article Resveratrol as Inducer of Autophagy Autophagy-lysosomal fusion was carried out by MG-132 and chloroquine, respectively, while induction of autophagy was achieved by rapamycin treatment. Detection of secreted cytokines by ARPE-19 cells using Human XL Cytokine Array was performed under oxidative stress H 2O 2 and resveratrol treatments, respectively.

    What is the best applicable inhibitor of autophagy?
     
  7. dimkins XenForo Moderator

    Top Ten PULSATILE Tinnitus Tips for Doctors Top Ten PULSATILE Tinnitus Tips For Doctors People with pulsatile -or pulse-synchronous- tinnitus hear a sound that is in sync with their heartbeat or pulse. Most commonly described as a “whooshing,” the sound can be heard on one or both sides. It is a symptom of an

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Pseudotumor Cerebri.